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squirmelia

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squirmelia

Spanish

I had my first Spanish lesson last night. The teacher explained how it is easy to confuse children with pubic hairs.

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Sounds like vital information to me.

The class concluded it was best just not to talk about children ever.

That works as a general rule, not just for Spanish class.

Always a good idea... :D

Huh? OK, I think I may need to re-learn spanish now... fairly sure they can't be confused... *wanders off in a mindblown state*

It may have been something to do with Spanish as spoken in some parts of South America? I'm not quite sure. I will have to search for it when I am at home.

The anecdote she told was something like, a guy shouted across the street to someone, "how are your sister's children?", but it could have meant, "how are your sister's pubic hairs?"

Not my part of South America, for sure*! I can't imagine how you could mistake nephews/pubic hairs!! Do you remember the actual words? 'Nephew' is 'sobrino..'


* Venezuela.

She didn't say the actual words, unfortunately. I will search later though! I presume it was some sort of colloquialism, but am unsure.

weird... ok, have asked my sister as she's far more good at spanish than me (it's what she does for a living)

I had a search and came up with:

"pendejo/a 1 [m, f, adj] [rude, but not insulting] child, kid, boy/girl; [usually appreciative] (someone who looks like) a young person; [derogatory] childish, improper for an adult person, esp. used of something made out of whim and arbitrariness (pendejada [n]); 2 [m] [generally only used among boys, very rude] a pubic hair. (Note well, the first meaning is not an insulting term of address as in Mexican Spanish.)"

i think perhaps your spanish teacher has failed to explain herself properly somewhere... also, i can tell you the most important thing is never to confuse raining with fucking.

Ian did that once... my mum and I will NEVER let him forget the day he said "esta jodiendo" instead of "esta lloviendo"

Her point was just that words can have slightly different meanings in different Spanish speaking countries, and I think she got that point across quite well really, even if she didn't explain it more than that. :)

Wikipedia says this:
"In Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, pendejo or pendeja refers to a child, usually with a negative connotation, like that of immaturity or a "brat"[citation needed]. Also, in Argentina, "pendejo" is a pubic hair, so someone called "pendejo" is someone of no value as a person. In Perú, however, it does not necessarily have a negative connotation, and can just refer to someone who is clever, especially with regards to street smarts."

I'll try not to confuse raining with fucking. :)

Is the Spanish for "fucking in the rain" a tonguetwister? ;)

jodiendo en la lluvia? no, not really...

Shows how little I know about how Spanish works, thanks!

In Italian, I once confused "coniglio" (rabbit) with "coglione" (arsehole, the expletive) when I meant the former.

As long as you don't confuse 'with' with 'using'.

Yes, that might be rather dodgy!

My favourite thing about Spanish is translating the names of famous actors, like Antonio Flags, Emilio This Time and Steve Look For Me. (Actually that one might be Italian.)

They sound like great names!

In Spanish Look-for-me would be Buscame, rather than Buscemi, but it is entertaining, yes :-)

Are Spanish children who have pubic hairs easily confused, then?

I have spoken Spanish for over 30 years and never had a problem with the above mentioned, it certainly didn't happen whilst living in Mexico, guessing your teacher isn't a native speaker?

Wikipedia says:
"In Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, pendejo or pendeja refers to a child, usually with a negative connotation, like that of immaturity or a "brat"[citation needed]. Also, in Argentina, "pendejo" is a pubic hair, so someone called "pendejo" is someone of no value as a person. In Perú, however, it does not necessarily have a negative connotation, and can just refer to someone who is clever, especially with regards to street smarts."

So, it sounds like it could be vaguely plausible, but I suspect the teacher (who I don't think is native) just told us the anecdote because it was amusing, and she wanted to emphasise that Spanish spoken in different countries may have slightly different meanings.

I find the idea of 'pendejo' being used to refer to children quite strange, as it's a pretty well-known insult. Literally, of course, it means pubic hair, but it also means idiot, arsehole, fuckwit etc.

The slang one I avoid is 'chocho' which means chuffed, pleased, over the moon - but it seems like the feminine version should be 'chocha' which is slang for 'pussy', so it's unwise to say to someone 'I hear you got a new job1 You must be chocha'.

The teacher didn't actually say it was 'pendejo', but that was what I came up with when I searched. I think she should have used a different example, as no-one here seems to think it is one that can be confused that easily!

I don't know of any other slang terms for pubic hair, and 'pelos pubicos' sounds nothing like any term I know for 'kids'...hmm, maybe a native speaker would be better able to advise.

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